Dolly Dress using the Cricut Maker

Now that I have my new Cricut Maker, I figured I’d have to try out all it’s cool features using one of the sewing patterns that’s in Cricut Design Space.  My daughter got one of the 18″ dolls for Christmas, and I’ve been sewing some clothes for it lately.  When I saw that there were a few doll clothes patterns for the Maker, I wanted to try one out.  I found a cute doll dress in the pattern, and got started.  Design Space tells you exactly how big to cut your fabric and how to lay the grainlines on the mat.  It also tells you which fabrics to put on which mats.  For this particular pattern, there were three different cuts that needed to be done.  I cut out my squares of fabric, and set up my Maker. cricutsew

The Cricut Maker has the capabilities of cutting out and marking your pattern pieces for you, so that there’s no guesswork.  After loading my mat, rotary blade, and fabric marking pen, I started with my first mat which cut out and mark the skirt pieces.  cricutsew2cricutsew3

After cutting and marking all of the pieces, I downloaded the sewing instructions from Cricut Design Space.  The first step has you sew down the center seams of both the main and the lining pieces of the bodice.  Next you line up the main and the lining with right sides together, after ironing down 1/4″ on the shoulders of the lining, with wrong sides together. cricutsew6

The armscyes and necklines are then sewn with a 1/4″ seam allowance. cricutsew7

After clipping the curves, the bodice is turned right side out.  The shoulders of the main fabric are then placed right sides together and sewn with 1/4″ seam allowance, without catching the lining in the seam.  The fabric is then pushed in between the two bodices and the lining is hand sewn together. cricutsew8

Next, the two skirt pieces were sewn together with the right sides together, using a 1/2″ seam allowance. The back center seam was sewn up to the notches, and then left unsewn at the top.  cricutsew9

At this point, the bodice and the skirt are sewn together.  The skirt and bodice are aligned right sides together and sewn with a 5/8″ seam allowance.  The main bodice and the skirt fabric seam are trimmed down.  cricutsew10

The lining is then hemmed at 1/4″ and top stitched down to create a casing for the elastic at the waist. cricutsew12

1/4″ elastic is then threaded through the casing and sewn down at the ends to create a cinched waist.  cricutsew13

1/2″ hook and loop is then sewn on the back to create the closure.  Both are attached right up against the raw edge.  The left side is then folded under to allow the hook and loop to keep the dress closed.  cricutsew15

Lastly, the dress is hemmed 1/4″ and then another 1/4″.  I added the cording by hand sewing it to the center, and tying it in a bow.  cricutsew18

I loved that my Cricut cut all of the pieces and marked them for me.  It made putting this dress together so simple.  The only thing that I wasn’t too fond of were the instructions.  I’ve never been a huge fan of only having written instructions with hard to follow illustrations.  These instructions weren’t too hard to follow, but I did struggle in a couple of areas.  cricutsew19cricutsew20

I love the final product, and I know my daughter will have a fun time putting it on her doll.  I can’t attest to all the sewing patterns in the Cricut Design Space, but this one was a winner!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

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